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Discuss the most surprising thing you learned from completing your dietary analysis?

How would your health benefit from making a change?

 

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1.DIETARY RECORDS:

a)Keep a written log of what and how much you eat and drink for 3 consecutive days. The 3-day dietary record must include one weekend day (Saturday or Sunday). An example template is included.Only ONE partner must do this if you are working in pairs.

The accuracy of your analysis will be dependent on how well you record your food intake!   To help make your records more accurate you should:

1.Keep your diet recording sheet with you for convenience (example attached)

 

2.Write down what you eat at the time that you eat it, to prevent forgetting things such as snacks and water.

 

3.Make sure you record portion sizes accurately. Practice measuring out portion sizes with measuring cups and spoons or a food scale. Become familiar with what different portion sizes look like on a plate or glass so that you can estimate when you don’t have the ability to measure, such as at a restaurant.

 

4.Don’t change your eating habits during these 3 days because you want to analyze your current eating pattern, not what you think is a good eating pattern

b)Using Diet Analysis Plus software, create a nutritional profile by clicking on the Create New Profile. Enter your name, height, weight and other personal information.  Next, enter your activity level according to the descriptions provided by the software and save your profile.

 

c)Enter your food intake for the three days you recorded in your log by clicking on the “Track Diet” tab and beginning with Day 1.  Type the name of the food you ate and click “Go”.  The more specific the search, the easier it will be to find your food.  For example, entering “Shake” brings up 196 possible foods but entering “McDonald’s Shake” brings up only 3 to choose from.  When you locate the item, click on the item to add the item to your food list.  You will then be asked to enter the meal (Breakfast, Lunch, Snack, Dinner) and the household measure of the amount of the product you ate.

Custom Foods and Recipes: If you cannot locate the food item you consumed, use the Custom Foods link (found under track diet) to add it. The food item must have a Nutrition Facts Table.  Click ‘Create New Food’.  Enter the Food Name.  Using the Nutrition Facts Table from your selected product, enter the nutrient breakdown including grams per serving.  Click Save.  Your product will now appear under the Custom Food List.   You can also input recipes using the Recipes link (found under track diet). Click ‘Create New Recipe’.  Enter the Recipe Name and Number of Servings, click save.  Find your recipe under the recipe list and click the edit button to add ingredients.   Click ‘Add Ingredients’ and type the name of the ingredient, then select “Go” to find the ingredient in the database.  Enter all of the recipes ingredients.  Using Track Diet to add one serving of your Custom Food or Recipe.

*** Supplements: The database includes many supplements (e.g. multivitamins) as well as protein powders. Input the supplements you take.

 

d)Click on “Reports”. Choose ‘Daily Food Log” and print a report for Day 1, 2 and 3 as a PDF. Click on “Intake vs Goals” – select the three days you tracked under the ‘date range’ tab and print this cumulative report as a PDF report. The “Intake” column of the “Intake vs Goals” printout provides you with information on how much of each nutrient you consumed in g/mg or mcg.    Print the “Intake Spreadsheet” for each of the 3 days.

 

DELIVERABLES :  You are to hand in the following printouts:

i.“Daily Food Log” Printout for Day 1, 2 and 3

ii.“Intake vs Goals” Print cumulative report only

iii.“Intake Spreadsheet” for Day 1, 2 and 3

 

QUESTIONS

2)MACRONUTRIENTS&AMDR CALCULATIONS

a)Calculate the percent of your calories that comes from each major nutrient (PRO, CHO, and Fat) and compare them with the AMDRs.  Use the Cumulative (i.e 3-day average) “Intake vs Goals” report for these calculations.  You are NOT required to do this for each day!  DO NOT USE the % Calories from fat, protein and carbohydrates that are listed in the report – this bar graph represents the percent of each nutrient you are receiving relative to the DRI, not the proportion relative to your caloric intake.  You have to manually figure out the % of calories that you are consuming from protein, carbohydrates and fat as taught in class.  For full marks show all calculations.

 

b)Compare your percent calories from each macronutrient to the AMDRs. Which (if any) of the macronutrients are you over consuming or under consuming as per the AMDR?

 

c)Discuss reasons and possible solutions for any imbalances.If diet is balanced, discuss contributing factors.

 

3)MICRONUTRIENTS

a)Fill in the attached “Nutrient Chart” provided by referencing your cumulative Actual vs Recommended Intake Printout.  Check off what nutrients are within (75%-100%), above (>100%) and below (<75%) recommended values.

 

b)Identify TWO micronutrients that you averaged less than 100% of the DRI. For each of the2 nutrients, answer the following questions using full sentence structure.

If you did not average less than 100% for any nutrient, choose two that were close to it.

i.Thoroughly explain the role of the nutrient in the human body.Avoid the use of technical jargon – use terminology your clients would understand.

 

ii.What are the possible health risks associated with under-consumption? Avoid the use of technical jargon – use terminology your clients would understand.

 

iii.Suggest 2 foods you would add or substitute to your diet to increase the amount of that nutrient in your diet. State the serving amount you would add and how much of the nutrient of concern it contains (e.g. ½ cup of orange juice would be added. It contains 100 mg vitamin C as per the Canadian Nutrient File, 2010). Comment on how your choices reflect your food preferences.Please note: *Do not list a supplement as an option to increase your intake.

 

iv.Discuss how you would incorporate the foods into your diet (i.e. at what meals and/or snacks? Would you use it to replace another food or simply add to your current diet?)

 

c.Identify TWO micronutrients that you averaged more than 100% of the DRI.For each of the 2 nutrients, answer the following questions using full sentence structure

If you did not average more than 100% for any nutrient, choose two that were close to it.

i.Explain the role of the nutrient in the human body. Avoid the use of technical jargon – use terminology your clients would understand.

 

ii.What, if any, are the possible health risks associated with over-consumption? Be sure to put your intake into context of the UL (i.e. if you averaged 110% of the DRI the relative risk is much different than if you averaged 1000% of the DRI). Avoid the use of technical jargon – use terminology your clients would understand.

 

iii.Referencing your Intake Spreadsheets, suggest 2 foods consumed during your 3-day intake that you would remove or reduce the serving size of from your diet to reduce the amount of that nutrient in your diet. State the serving amount you would remove and how much of the nutrient of concern will be reduced(e.g. as per my Day 2 Intake Spreadsheet, the food I consumed with the highest amount of sodium was an order of large McDonalds French fries. To reduce the amount of sodium in my diet, I will choose a small order of fries instead of a large will save 300 mg of sodium as per McDonald’s online nutrition information, 2014).

 

iv.Comment on how your choices reflect your food preferences and mention an appropriate substitution should you decide taking out the stated food item would leave you hungry (e.g. I would add a side salad to ensure my appetite is satisfied after switching to a small order of fries).

 

4.YOUR PERSPECTIVE

a.As a conclusion, summarize what you have learned from this completing this assignment.Include a response to the following questions in your response:

i.Discuss the most surprising thing you learned from completing your dietary analysis?

 

ii.What did your dietary analysis confirm about your diet that you were already aware of?

 

iii.Describe specific ways how your diet promotes good health. Explain the benefits that you experience and/or may experience in the future.

 

iv.Describe specific ways how your diet isn’t health promoting.How would your health benefit from making a change?

 

v.What dietary changes, if any, are you most likely to make and why? Be specific with your response (e.g. reducing overall sodium intake by choosing processed foods less often and making homemade meals instead). What dietary changes, if any, are you least likely to change and why?

 

NUTRIENT CHART

Nutrient <75% of DRI 75-100% of DRI >100% of DRI
Vitamin A (RAE)
Thiamine
Riboflavin
Niacin
Vitamin B6
Vitamin B12
Folate
Vitamin C
Alpha-Tocopherol (Vitamin E)
Calcium
Iron
Magnesium
Vitamin D
Potassium
Sodium
Zinc

 

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